Trial by Fire – Jennifer Lynn Barnes

I’ve been waiting and waiting for this one while the library ordered it. Finally! I have to say, I was disappointed. The problem is that my expectations were too high, because it was a great book. It just wasn’t as great as I expected. Le sigh… no one to blame for that but me. 🙂

Trial By Fire reviewBefore I get ahead of myself… this is the second book in a series (I wrote about the first one, Raised by Wolves, in May). So it’s the continuation of Brynn’s story. As suggested by the first book’s title, Brynn is a human girl who was raised by a pack of werewolves. She’s a pretty badass heroine for a teen novel – not in an annoying, stereotypical kind of way, but in a very real way. (Well. As real as can be when you are referring to a story about werewolves.) In Trial by Fire, Brynn has become the pack leader of a collection of misfit werewolves, and struggles to keep them alive in the face of threats from neighbouring packs as well as some human threats.

Barnes is truly a gifted writer and her books always have an authenticity to them that most writers for teens struggle to achieve. Brynn is forced to let some of her independence go, to trust in and rely on the members of her pack, in order to survive and to do what’s best for the pack.

I wonder if there will be a third book in this series; if so, I’m definitely interested to see where Barnes takes the plot.

In other news, I’ve been re-reading the Anne of Green Gables series. So genius, so great. I got through the first four and I think I am now on Anne overload… either that or the books are getting worse. I’ve also been continuing my (somewhat reluctant and incredibly slow) exploration of non-fiction, so stay tuned for more on that…

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Matched by Ally Condie

I read this one a while ago, but I’ve thought about it on quite a few occasions since then. I was pleasantly surprised by this book.

Book review Matched Ally CondieThe story opens just as Cassia, a 17-year-old living in a tightly controlled world, is about to find out who her ‘match’ is — that is,  the man she’ll be spending the rest of  her happily choreographed life with. Unlike most of the other 17-year-olds who go through this process, Cassia knows her match once he is revealed: Xander is someone she’s grown up with, and a close friend. But when the pops the disc that each person is given at their matching ceremony into her player, two faces appear. Xander’s, and someone else’s — and Cassia knows this person’s face, too.

I’m not often huge on dystopian fiction, so I was surprised by how much I liked this book. Condie has a real knack for spinning tales, that’s for sure. I won’t say this was an amazing book or anything, but I enjoyed the read. Lots of folks have compared it to Lois Lowry‘s The Giver, but it’s been approximately one hundred years since I read that so I can’t comment.

When poking around on the internet before writing this post, I landed on the book’s website. Now THAT is amazing. So clever! The site is designed so that you, the website visitor, feel like you are entering into Cassia’s Society-controlled world. You can even find out who your match is! [Full disclosure, I didn’t do this part, since I already know who my ‘match’ is. But I think it’s cool that you can do it.]