Bitterblue by Kristin Cashore

Yes, it’s true: I’m still alive. Apologies for my long silence. I had a baby girl in April (yay) and she has taken up a lot of my time.

Go figure!

cutie baby feet

Don’t worry, I still had time to read a few books. Twenty, to be exact. I will hit the highlights though, rather than writing about all of them. No sense discussing the ones I didn’t enjoy (why revisit mediocrity, right?).

Top of the list, and most recently finished, is Bitterblue. Cashore is a wonder, and while I didn’t love Bitterblue as much as Graceling or Fire, I really enjoyed it. So, just to be clear, Bitterblue is the sequel to Graceling (and companion to Fire; as Fire was a companion novel to Graceling). Naturally, this has me hoping that there will be a sequel to Fire, but who knows.

Bitterblue (Po’s niece) becomes queen of Monsea at the age of 10, and the book begins when she is 18. Trying to bring her kingdom out of the shadows of her terrible father Leck’s reign, she is now beginning to question the wisdom of her advisors; men who have helped her manage the kingdom since she became queen. Bitterblue decides to learn about her kingdom, as well as the people in it and what they truly need, by herself.

BitterblueCashore has, once again, created a truly inspiring heroine at the centre of this novel. I did find the book to be much darker than either Graceling or Fire, but that may be just because I find Leck so disconcertingly scary as a character. Seriously spooky. As with Katsa and Fire, Cashore did a beautiful job showing Bitterblue’s growth into a woman, but in Bitterblue’s case, into a queen also.

One thing I found frustrating (Warning! Spoiler follows!) was the unresolved romance interest for Bitterblue. Does she find herself a king? She seems to have a connection with Giddon, but what about Saf? Oh Cashore, you big meanie! I wanted to know who ends up making her a happy girl!!

I loved reading about the changes taking place in Monsea and the other kingdoms – the uprising in Estill, and the installation of a council rather than a king. I am hoping to hear more about this world in other books from Cashore! My copy of the book has beautiful illustrations of the bridges Leck built in Bitterblue City at the back, as well as maps of the castle and the kingdoms. I wonder, though, why a map of Bitterblue City wasn’t included, since Bitterblue asked for one in the book and received many from librarian Death (pronounced ‘Deeth’ – one of my favourite characters, incidentally)? I think it would have been a nice addition. I also think all the maps, and maybe the even the illustrations of the bridges, should appear at the front of the book! I went looking for a map of the kingdoms in my copy of Graceling before I thought to flip to the back of Bitterblue for maps! (Are you listening, Dial?)

The other extremely cool thing about this book is the focus on ciphers (codes). I love codes! So exciting that Bitterblue is cracking them throughout the book. All in all this was a fantastic read (even with the haunting undertone of Leck running throughout… I felt like his creepy ghost was standing two steps behind me the entire time I read this book! eek.), and I now have a bigger girl-crush on Kristin Cashore. Amazing writer! I read the acknowledgements at the back and was impressed that she mentioned the politics of Po’s disability and how it didn’t occur to her when she was writing Graceling that “making Po’s Grace grow so big that it compensated for his blindness ad the end of Graceling…. It didn’t occur to me, until it was too late, that I had disabled Po, then given him a magical cure for his disability — thus implying that he couldn’t be a whole person and also be disabled.” It didn’t occur to me, either, Cashore. Glad she pointed it out.

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2 responses

  1. Oooh, I just finished this one a couple days ago too! 🙂

    Death was probably my favorite character out of the whole book. I’m drawn to the overpowered librarian types.

    This was such an amazing book. I haven’t read Graceling or Fire yet, but now I have to.

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