Crossed by Ally Condie

I’ve been on the hold list for this one at the library since mid-December. Finally got it!! So exciting.

Crossed book reviewCrossed is the sequel to Matched, and I think Ally Condie has done a good job of keeping my interest in the story through this book (there will be a third, too, as this is a trilogy).

Crossed continues to follow the story of Cassia. I know you all clicked on the Matched link above so you’ve refreshed your memory of the story line. In this sequel, Cassia has left the Borough and is doing work detail, trying to find her opportunity to get to the Outer Provinces and look for Ky. When the chance comes, Cassia takes a friend along – Indie, a strong-minded girl who’s on her work detail. Ky has escaped, and as they find Ky’s trail and follow it into The Carving (canyonlands), all the while trying to stay away from the Society’s watchful eyes.

Spoiler Alert: I’m gonna talk about it all after this, so if you haven’t read the book and want to, don’t read on…

Condie writes this one from two points of view, Cassia’s and Ky’s. Great thinking, Condie – it’s much more compelling to read about everything in the first person (I think). That said, towards the end of the book, Condie shifts back and forth between the two voices much more frequently and it becomes painfully apparent that the voices aren’t actually different enough for me to believe that they come from two separate people. Hmm.

The other thing I found slightly frustrating was that the plot does one of those full circle things. I HATE that sh*t (see my first post about not finishing Journey to the Centre of the Earth). We’ve just followed Cassia and Ky on this nearly epic journey, only to find that the resistance thinks Cassia would best serve the cause from within Society. Seriously?! THAT was your brilliant plot idea for the second novel in a trilogy? Come on, Condie. Perhaps I find this so frustrating because Condie dangles such a delicious sounding plot carrot in front of us readers close to the end of the book – Cassia could skip out on the Society AND the Rising and high-tail it for the hills with Ky. HELLO. Obvious choice! I would have been more interested in reading about this in the third book. 

All in all I enjoyed this book, but it was a bit of a let-down — Condie did a great job of creating a unique dystopian society where her characters struggled to live within its bounds in Matched… in this book, the Society felt less than three-dimensional (possibly even a bit stereotyped!) and Cassia wasn’t nearly as interesting either.

So… there you have it. Read it at your own risk. I still enjoyed the book – it was a great, quick YA read – but it was no masterpiece (sorry Condie, but you know it’s true- I still admire you for writing books).

In other exciting news, I just read a killer additional scene from Hex Hall (remember that? the book that started it all here on spines and soles?). Rachel Hawkins wrote an additional scene between our girl Sophie and Archer. Ver-ry juicy, mmm. AND, get this: she has promised to write another one about Sophie and Cal. Heck yes! So head on over to her blog and read some YA goodness.

This is the last post I’ll be writing from Vancouver Island… sniff. Next time you hear from me, I’ll be in much closer proximity to the Rocky Mountains.

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Prom & Prejudice by Elizabeth Eulberg

Once again I am woefully behind here. Nonetheless, I have been reading so let’s focus on that.

I just finished up Prom and Prejudice by Elizabeth Eulberg. Not surprisingly it is based on Austen‘s Pride and Prejudice. I found it to be very entertaining.

Prom and Prejudice book reviewLizzie is a scholarship student at snobby Longbourn Academy, where the girls are obsessed with prom (the event is covered by Vanity Fair). Lizzie is largely snubbed by her wealthy classmates. Her only friends are Jane, her roommate, and Charlotte, the other scholarship student. With prom fast approaching, Longbourn girls are doing everything they can to line up dates with guys from neighbouring all-boys Pemberley School, and designer dresses to wear to the event. But Lizzie has more important things to focus on, and she meets someone who is so different from all the Pemberley guys that she might actually like him.

The story is very closely based on Austen’s original – names of characters included. It was a quick read and the story was cleverly adapted to modern day. I liked it so much that I went out and grabbed Eulberg‘s other book, The Lonely Hearts Club, from the library. Liked it too. I’m always glad to read good adaptations of my favourite classics, and in this case I was lucky enough to discover a new writer too.

Last month I picked up the graphic novel version of Pride and Prejudice, and was surprised by how much I enjoyed it.  It was done by Hilary Burningham and I was surprised to find out how many classics have been turned into graphic novels. A whole new way to enjoy my classics! I can’t wait to pick up the graphic novel of Jane Eyre.

I’ve also read through the Hunger Games series, but don’t feel the need to create a separate post for these books as they aren’t new releases and they’ve been reviewed ad nauseam, I’m sure. Suffice it to say that I picked them up on the recommendation of my sister-in-law, and couldn’t believe how much I liked them. As I’ve mentioned on here before, dystopian fantasy/sci-fi isn’t often my cup of tea (you know, happy ending mandate and all that), but I thought these were fantastic. Katniss rivals Brynn as far as badass heroines go.

Speaking of badass heroines… well, ok, not-so-baddass heroines… I also read  Iron Daughter by Julie Kagawa. I wrote about the first novel in the series, Iron King, here.  The concept for Kagawa’s world was still really unique, but the plot wasn’t my favourite and I found that the main character, Meghan, less than badass and actually kinda whiney. I may not read on in the series.

I’m learning so much by reading all these books. Who knew I got so attached to the characters!

 

Matched by Ally Condie

I read this one a while ago, but I’ve thought about it on quite a few occasions since then. I was pleasantly surprised by this book.

Book review Matched Ally CondieThe story opens just as Cassia, a 17-year-old living in a tightly controlled world, is about to find out who her ‘match’ is — that is,  the man she’ll be spending the rest of  her happily choreographed life with. Unlike most of the other 17-year-olds who go through this process, Cassia knows her match once he is revealed: Xander is someone she’s grown up with, and a close friend. But when the pops the disc that each person is given at their matching ceremony into her player, two faces appear. Xander’s, and someone else’s — and Cassia knows this person’s face, too.

I’m not often huge on dystopian fiction, so I was surprised by how much I liked this book. Condie has a real knack for spinning tales, that’s for sure. I won’t say this was an amazing book or anything, but I enjoyed the read. Lots of folks have compared it to Lois Lowry‘s The Giver, but it’s been approximately one hundred years since I read that so I can’t comment.

When poking around on the internet before writing this post, I landed on the book’s website. Now THAT is amazing. So clever! The site is designed so that you, the website visitor, feel like you are entering into Cassia’s Society-controlled world. You can even find out who your match is! [Full disclosure, I didn’t do this part, since I already know who my ‘match’ is. But I think it’s cool that you can do it.]