Cruel Beauty by Rosamund Hodge

Hello to any of you fair readers who have been patient enough to stick around. It’s been awhile, I know. Aren’t jobs wonderful? They pay you for doing something, thus allowing you to pay for things you need and want. Aren’t toddlers a joy? Puttering about with their cute voices and ever-present bodily functions that need attention. Alas, the downside of both of these things, the joy and the wonder, is that in my life they take precedence over blogging. Alack. Because I’ve been reading, my fellow book lovers. I’ve been reading some amazing things.

Cruel Beauty coverLet’s get into it, shall we? (No one ever said segues were one of my strong points). I’ve been thinking a lot lately about female characters in YA adventure tales – mostly fantasy. Cue Cruel Beauty, delivered into my iBooks shelves last night. Nyx is our heroine here, and she’s been given an impossible task: kill the demon who has been terrorizing her world for the past 900 years. After she marries him. Because her father bargained with the demon for her mother’s life, and promised Nyx to the demon in marriage before she was even born. Oh, and she will most likely die trying to kill the demon.

Yes, it’s a reimagining of beauty and the beast. I’m a sucker for fairy tale retellings, as you may know. I’m also a sucker for the imperfect heroine, which Nyx is; she’s known her fate since a young age and resents her twin sister, who gets to stay home and marry whoever she choses; who hasn’t been forced to study the hermetic arts all her life in training to kill her future husband. Nyx has become a master at stifling her anger and her hate, so that her sister can’t see them.

There were a lot of elements that I really liked here. Hodge works some Greek mythology into the story, and creates a very interesting ‘beast’. The deities of her world are mysterious and tricky and their sense of fairness seems warped, since only they can see the whole truth of the world.

But what got me thinking afterward was this: I’m also currently reading a (non-fiction! gasp!) book called Leave Me Alone, I’m Reading: Finding and losing myself in books by Maureen Corrigan. She’s talking about female adventure tales, and how in literature the adventures that female characters face are more often day-to-day tasks that require great character and endurance (caring for family members, for example) than what we typically think of adventures (such as the things male characters often face, such as traveling to the arctic or some similar feat of great physical courage that is short-lived when you compare it to caring for a family member for their entire life). Corrigan goes on to talk about Jane Eyre as one of the great female adventure stories. Now, Jane Eyre happens to be my favourite book. And I am now finding myself drawn to fantasy books with female heroines who are typically facing these great physical adventures that might typically be faced by male characters if they had been written back in the day. (Arguably). BUT, there is usually also a big element of heroines facing self-doubt in these books as well.

I don’t want to wreck Cruel Beauty for you if you haven’t yet read it, but I will say it had me thinking about a lot of the YA fantasy heroines I read today, and that they now seem to be the ultimate adventurers; I think they would fit Corrigan’s descriptions of both the typical male adventurer (climb the unclimbable mountain, etc.) and the typical female adventurer (tasks that tend to entail more waiting and endurance and showing strength through years of strain). Which is pretty awesome.

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